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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
environment. the third sister was alan. she lasted both of resistors and is working for skinner at the time of the flood and is a stronger character of the book and after words help to salvage his silk and she moved to holyoke and ultimately married his bookkeeper. after the flood the valley could potentially be somebody else's gain. after the disaster the valley was a popular spot for investors and capitalist. investors came as far away from omaha nebraska to give them incentives to relocate to other areas. one of the most vocal voices was from holyoke massachusetts. they were ingenious lee is specifically designed for industry. it was hoped to be greater than the urban centers. holyoke was the greatest potential power of new england. the dam the connecticut river on the right is at the crest of a 60-foot fall capable of generating 30,000-horsepower that was the power of 300 mills. the cotton lords that created holyoake devised a three tiered canal system. it does not show on this map the connecticut river could be used over three times. holyoke made offers to the manufacturers in the vall
. but it was also the case that in some environments that i wonder if in the disabled community, which was such an important stewardship, are their attempts to find ways to create technology and multi-sensory experiences for readers as they consume cultural artifacts certainly real book is a multi-sensory experience within itself. that is an old technology comparable to the print book. beyond that, i believe that there is not very much work being done in that area and i am very anxious that we should be able to provide braille to people in the disabled community to the music. the reason for that goes back, i think, to where it makes sense. obviously, it makes a lot of sense. but it is also a reading experience that is very different from audio reading and experiences that way. a lot of people have come to the conclusion that it is just as good for a blind person to listen to a book to read it in braille, and i totally disagree with that. it's a very difficult way of learning however, and i don't think it gives the generation of functionally illiterate kids by telling them just listen t
together. it was very much a family environment. the third sister to come work for skinner was ellen littlefield. now, ellen outlasted both of her sisters at the mill, and she was working for skinner at the time of flood. she is the strongest female character in my book. after the flood. >> she also worked with skinner helping to salvage his silk, and she moved to holyoke and ultimately married his bookkeeper. now, after the flood the valley's loss was going to be or could be potentially someone else's gain. so after the disaster happened, the valley was a very popular spot for investors and capitalists. offers came from all over, from as far away as omaha, nebraska, to the manufacturers that had lost everything giving them incentives to move elsewhere and to relocate to other areas. one of the most vocal voices in this choir was that of holyoke, massachusetts. and holyoke was an ingeniously-designed city, specifically designed for industry. it was hoped to be even greater than the urban mill centers of lawrence. holyoke was considered to be the greatest potential mill power in new e
a sudden they will be operating in truly hostile environments where they do not have the hearts and minds of the people themselves. the latest reports out of syria, though, show no progress on the diplomatic front. so far the one peace enjoy who has been able to meet with president bashar al-assad has walked away with every one of the meetings, including won't day saying we are at the same point we were before a civil war going on, and bashar al-assad saying he's not leaving and will continue to fight even if that means killing thousands of more of his own people. >> reporter: it seems to be so difficult was bashar al-assad continues to blame all of this on insurgents or terrorists if you will. >> reporter: i'm sorry, say again. we're having a problem with the signal. >> reporter: i apologize for that. the problem really lies in bashar al-assad's stand. he continues to blame awful his attacks on his own country coming from terrorism. >> reporter: well, he may have a point at some level in that sense, kelly. you have the rebels who are based there inside of syria, a number of them are hard
to experience work environments. long hours and everything else working life entails. wherever you go, there's always listens. it may not be where you want, but i'm sure there's going to be a lesson learned. every adolescent is the opportunity to prepare for work so they can start careers at an equal stance. [applause] >> i'm looking for a young man from one else. again, there's a case of mistaken identity. the one nearest to me. >> young people in my constituency said evenness goes as good when it got experience, but why can't you and skills in the classroom such as lifelong learning that the curriculum. work experience is always good, but you're not going to go to get the skills and this is good, but i think it would be better for one people in the long run. [applause] >> i'm sorry there is confusion in monaco. i would now like to call the woman who thought i was calling but i wasn't he running it now. every shia from, please. [inaudible] >> we need your experience and training for work in the modern world if this is essential for young people. for me, work experience is the best opportuni
to inspire individuals in my work environment or on the job. after i went on to college, the campus asked me to be a recruiter for them. i went back to my high school and got a record number of people to apply to the university. the power and the emotion, the fire in the belly is there in us. for people that did not have role models, they need to be inspired. i did not always get it from women. find it in other places, all that helps. that is the kind of energy that was given to me. "i'm going to take a risk. i may not be perfect at it." >> do you work all the time? >> i am in mourning person -- morning person. >> i could be on the west coast and i am not at 5:00 a.m. and people on the west coast would say i'm crazy. i will lose the thought so why do wit. i am an early riser. that was something that was instilled in us. >> is 5:00 a.m. kind of typical? >> yes. >> how late did you work? >> i tried to get in at a decent hour. as a pastime, people do not think that we do this but i like to cook. i try to eat healthy. i will do cooking of vegetables and light entrees. something i enjoy is making
the stimulus not only did good for the economy, but what it means for the environment. it's a story that's gotten lost on the politics. >> host: we have to have your comment as an employee of "usa today." we have to have you comment on u.s.a. tomorrow. guess what i should think sir for her plug for that. the newspaper in september was 30 years old from this little bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world be like 30 years from now, which would leave, what are we talking about, 2042? fare as his little better that than i am. anyway, they made their predictions there was talk about what it means for their industry. we put out a little tab and now that tab is now an e-book, which i think you can buy with a grand total of $1.89. it hasn't really taken off yet. the short form, somewhere between a book and magazine. amazon has been doing them. they can be posted almost immediately. and they sell for two or $3, $4, maybe more. if you have made the sellers list. some have been some fiction. a story she called to him to be a short story and too short to b
for the economy but what it means for the environment, sort of a story that got lost in all the politics in washington. >> we have to have you comment as an employee of usa today on u.s. aid tomorrow. >> and the day after. the newspaper in september was 30 years old so a bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world would be like 30 years from now which would be what are we talking about? 20, 40, 2042. >> we talked about what it means for their industry and we put out a little tab and now that tab, broadsheet is now an e-book which i think you can buy for the grand total of $1.99. it hasn't really taken off yet. the short form somewhere in between a book and magazine, there are a lot of good ones, amazon has been doing them, they posted almost immediately and they sell for $2 or $3. a few of them have made the best-seller list, some have been fiction. amy tan wrote the story she called too long to be a short story and too short to be a novel and focused on that. >> the wars continue to produce books including "little america: the war within the war f
8. the article cites a tough consumer environment in general and strong competition from rivals apple and amazon. >> and joining us now to talk more about this and what's going on in tech land, brian white, he covers tech and capital markets and he's coming to us from hong kong this morning, i believe. good morning to you. >> yeah, good morning, andrew. >> i don't know if you had a chance to see this that "new york times" piece this morning. but i don't know what it portends not only for microsoft but for the other players and others that sell windows devices. >> well, i'll tell you what, you know, we went to taiwan and china in october and the buzz around windows 8 fell off a cliff from the june time period. so there's a lot of enthusiasm in june at the show in taipei. and by october, there was no enthusiasm. so i think a lot of the momentum had been lost and a lot of companies told me, look, it's really a second half of 2013 story. >> so what does that mean, not only for microsoft were but for the hardwaremaker? are being buying products from dell and the like and buying the w
-show host bill bennett. and a look ahead at the political environment in 23,
made the trains run on time. that was the environment that i grew up in and i felt very comfortable when bill i asked me to finish the book. again, silly me, i thought i can do this. whether it was hubris or not -- >> what do you think he saw i knew that he had not seen in any of the other possible writers? >> we did talk about that. he told me once -- he said, try to find someone. he said, this is like a mother giving away her children to be raised by another. i would say, bill. he would say, nice try, but no. he said "if i wanted anyone, and i do not, i would want a writer." later, when he last, he said "paul, you have written 500, 600 feature stories. that is where i started." he saw the journalists as having the same tools as the historian when it comes to sourcing. when all of that is assembled, tell a story that would pass the campfire test, i call it, a bunch of folks sitting around a campfire. and i guess he liked my stories. >> so, if you had to pick out of this book your favorite story, what would they be? >> i enjoyed his battles over the american second front and when to
partisan political environment. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> it's all downhill from there. [laughter] my lawyer will take any complaints later. thank you so much, and thank you to what, for what you all do here. i am a, i shopped here as a young washington monthly editor. shopped is too strong. we didn't have any money. as you all may remember, washington monthly editors were paid $10,000 a year which, as kate boo -- who won the national book award last night adding to her amazing list of of accomplishments -- kate used to say she knew she had actually graduated from the monthly when she could buy entrees as well as appetizers in restaurants. so i never actually spent money here, but i'll try to fix that. i am enormously grateful. i am a southerner, i'm from tennessee and think that understanding jeffson in his regional context as well as his national context and his political context is hugely important. he was a master of politics whether it was idealogically driven or geographically driven, and i think there's something resonant about a ferociously-divided atmosphere, b
seem to be having a negative impact on the environment. >> yeah. michael, i imagine it's difficult to get out and want to spend when you're worried about your taxes going up next year. and how you're going to allocate your budget. i want to ask about some of the places that we did see spending. what were some of the segment groups? was it apparel, electronics? you know, luxury has surprisingly held up a little bit. so where did we see the dollars that were spent go? >> sure. let's start with luxury. luxury nationally had a difficult year because -- primarily because about 20% of luxury retail sales originated out of the new york area. if new york has a difficult season, that's going to be difficult on the overall numbers. that said, in the southeast and the south central regions of the country, luxury sales were up 5% to 6%. so again, it depended where you were. but luxury retail sales did relatively well. other sectors, women's apparel did have a positive year. as well as furniture and furnishing were also up. primarily we think due to the housing market recovery. >> yeah. today a
, of the environment and i think of andy's work in that way, of his experience. we're both from pennsylvania so i always -- i feel a sense of that. but, you know, when i think of the work, again, it's a complete kind of externalization and of playing very god like situation. playing the creator of -- you can multiply, you can procreate image after image and at the same time you can have aspects of how we interpret images of perfection, defined images into abstraction of life and death. so they're so rich, the whole aspect of what it means to be alive and a sense of our parameters that might take place in drama in this work. >> rose: this is? >> well, this is disaster painting. warhol did a number of these orange disaster and it's an electric chair. in 1963 he was preparing for an exhibition in paris and he said "i'm going to call this show "death in america." but the image of death, the electric chair, is made kind of pretty in these electric chairs but i think there's so much conflict or complexity to the prettiness of warhol's banality. i think banality is really i sort of hinted at. i think th
and we are all products of our environment. the valley of death, the korengal valley was called that because of the amount of contact we were taking, the amount of firefights. small arms fire, rpgs, rockets, whatever it may be. that tour for us was a 15-month tour, which was -- that's pretty long for -- >> that's a long time. >> -- for some young people. and we did what we were trained to do. we engaged the populous. we're there to hopefully make their lives better. help them out, find better ways to help them do the same thing they've been doing. and when i wrote the book, i wrote the book to one describe the valley, but, two, to describe the people around me. so often i'm congratulated or patted on the back or thanked. i've never done anything in the military alone. that's one the military does really great, is build a team and keep the team together. and kind of writing the book, i was able to put my buddies' names in print and highlight the actions that they have done, because there's so many great things that men and women in uniform do every single day and we don't hear ab
'll see prices go up in that environment. a lot of people are not willing to sell. they say the price of my home is still down big time. prices need to go up. >> home prices are in the eyes of the beholder, right? if you're still underwater, you need a dramatic increase in the price of your home in terms of percentages to get back to even. those people aren't going to feel like things are off the bottom. definitely i've seen here in new york city bidding wars on apartments. there have been improvements in some parts of the country. >> the market is percier. i still feel like a loser because of, kayla, what you were saying. i'm still down from where i was. >> you don't want to sell. >> right. anyhow, let's talk about chicago. i'll be there next week with the morning star mutual manager fund of the year. i'm going to find that chicago is going to have the most expensive parking meters in the country. $6.50 per hour down on the loop. four years ago most of the windy city's parking meters cost just 25 cents per hour. this is demand pricing, isn't it, michelle? >> i love it. you let prices
with the environment, being off the grid, so there is no cell phone service here. and really, really appreciating your surroundings. the bay of fire in australia is in the most stunning, most unspoiled area of tazmania in the northwest coast. this is a place that really you have to be committed to going to, because part of the process of getting there is actually hiking for two days on these beautiful white sand dunes, and you hike -- it's not a lot of hiking, but you are definitely out there, and being a little bit adventurous. this is a place, again, that's off the grid. you're going to have no tvs, you're going to be pumping the water for your own showers. the reason you go there and the payoff, the incredible wildlife. you want to see wombats, wallabees, kangaroos, this is the place to go. hicks island is the brain child of an architect who was obsessed with how beautiful the surroundings were and wanted to celebrate that. so he built these incredible modern structures that are made of concrete, and the rooms only have three sides. that means one side is completely open to the elements. the brand-
. ultimately that was what we knew and what we understood about our environment. >> within the family, what were some of the dynamics? >> my father was latin -- mexico-american. my mother was european-american so that kind of created a very tense -- sort of other complicated household, and they had a lot of children right away, in the late '60s, early 70s, and i don't know if this is actually traditional to most hispanic or latin american families but my sisters were the property of my mother, and my brother and myself were the property of my dad, and as boys, working with a father who own as trucking company, we were sort of like the indentured laborers and my sisters were learning this phenomenal, idealic lifestyle aspirin successes. so that's one of the tensions i draw from early on in the book. >> how much of your family is still alive and what did they think of the book? >> every member of my family is still alive. even my grandmother, and while the story is tough and gritty, they've actually been supportive. my mother and my father haven't really come to terms with it. they find the s
or shrug us off. that that was environment the cost of planetary dominatiodominatio n that had begun to haunt us. we live with all three legacies of around the world travel, every emerging fear that the planet could simply shrugged this off, continuing confidence if we might be able to generate technology and political alliances to dominate the planet but doubt that it is always wise to dominate it in that way. is especially apparent that the characteristic confidence of the long 19th century was the shortest of planetary experiences. yet it has been the most difficult for us to really push. our current doubt seem to be taking us back to the fears of the early modern period, circular return that matches the swing around the globe that themselves went through the three acts of sheer drama. there were always more hopeful elements to the story. bright moments matter to mcaneny clear that the human passes a complicated and contradictory condition whether seen on a small-scale or a large one, even the largest of all, a geo-drama in three acts. well, i wish i could introduce you to all of
would negatively impact the learning environment. he said he is for gun control and removing the barriers to mental health treatment >>> a teenager shot earlier this month is speaking out for the first time. she said she is lucky to be alive. a gunman stormed the mall and killing people. >> she and a friend were able to make it out to ask for help. >> it is bullet fragment that is she got out. >> people are sending cards. e-mailing. and saying they are praying for me. that helps. it is a big impact. >> she just got home from the hospital last week. she is hoping to return to school after winter break. >>> a dangerous happening in vacaville, the car was stopped at a chevron gas station. they found drugs along with several sawed-off shotguns. >> the way the weapons have been altered, they are designed to conceal, hide. and produce and inflict a lot of damage rapidly. >> getting the weapons off the street made our streets safer today. >> they took one person into custody and faces multiple counts with possession and intent to distribute drugs >>> they are trying to piece togethe
and halt the radical agendas off republicans in north carolina. to protect the state's environment, you vetoed a bill for hydraulic fracking. and you also vetoed a bill that would have increased insurance cost for teachers. to shield homeowners you extended the state's emergency foreclosure program. i know it has been hard. i know you have often lost, but you did not shy a wway from fighting the difficult battles when issues of fairness and justice were on the line which is why, as you prepare to leave office next week, i'm going to ask you to take up one last cause and to use the power of your office to do what only you can do. governor perdue, it is time to par d pardon the wilmington ten. as you know 1972 nine african-american men and one white woman were wronglily convicted of firebombing a store. most of them were teenagers ats the time, and despite shaky evidence, the musics and student activists were sentenced to 282 years in prison. governor perdue, you must stated that there is nobody in america who could say that trial was fair or that there wasn't some kind of undercurrent or
, from the larger political environment to do something. will this afternoon's meeting have an impact? too soon to say, but it's a step that's intended to show they're working at it. willie. >> kelly o'donnell on capitol hill. thank you. we're joined now by republican senator john thune of south dakota and democratic senator chuck schumer of new york. gentlemen, good morning. by my count, we're less than 90 hours away now from the new year's eve deadline. senator thune, let me start with you. what do you and republicans need from democrats to get a deal done? >> well, what we would like to see, willie, is first off something that deals with spending. we believe this isn't a revenue issue. this is a spending issue. that ought to be a part of any solution. secondly, we ought to focus on jobs and the economy. anything that is done ought to be focused on what can we do to get the economy expanding, create jobs. when people are working, they're paying more taxes. the government is generating more revenue. that makes all these problems smaller by comparison. jobs and growth ought to be a gu
want to cook it in a moist environment so it doesn't dry out of the ham. >> you didn't put a ton in there? >> not a lot. a couple of o.j. the at the bottom. >> it's a little uneven. i apologize for this. >> this is easy. you don't have to be particular about it. i'm not a chef but a cook. 375 in the oven until it's 145 degrees internally. it takes about 45 minutes. here is the ham. >> i know it's incredibly good. make this today. >> really easy. when you take it out of the oven, tent it with aluminum foil while it rests for a minute. if you peel it off too soon, it will get dry on you. the next thing to do in the same oven, 37 5 degrees is my easy h roasted sweet potato mash. these are four pounds sweet t potatoes and two pounds of vidalia onions and some salt and permanen pepper. it troroasts for 45 minutes. put it in after you put the ham in. you drop everything in here. this is simple. it's just roasted red potatoes or sweet potatoes, excuse me, some onions and the olive oil and salt and pepper on top. then four tablespoons of butter. >> there's the key right there. there it i
up. it's already a financially constrained environment. but customers tax rates will go up creating less demand for my products and less revenue for me and less tax revenue for the government. i want to urge congress and senators to vote for keeping our tax cuts in place, especially for the middle class and pushing our fiscal crisis to a balanced approach. go ahead and eliminate those tax cuts for the wealthiest individuals. if we all look at it and tried to consider what was going to work for the best, we needed to look at consumer demand. consumer demand is in the 98% of us who are out there driving the economy. the economy require strong consumer sentiment and strong business. i am urging congress to take action. stop playing games. let's move on. thank you. [applause] >> thank you so much, bob. it's a wonderful to have a sensible message from a a small business who really knows what makes our country work. now, i am honored to introduce to you stu and theresa. the mother of three in maryland and will talk to us about the reality she experiences both house and mother but also wor
people under the age of 18 who work in any sort of environment cannot work for some types of heavy machinery. if we put this as our national campaign for this year, it's unrealistic to think we of the youth parliament can make such a great influence on government legislation which have such huge opposition from larger companies. it's not realistic we can make a change in one year so we should focus on something which we can change, which is bettering our criminal almost -- better rur curriculum. [applause] >> who wave we got from the west midlands? you at the end. thank you. >> i'd like you all to raise your hands if you have an -- -- she gets paid five pounds. an older sister who is two years older gets paid seven pounds. how is that fair? >> who have we got from london? the chap there with the white shirt. yes, indeed, you, sir. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'm john from london. i'd like to echo the other young people who said the minimum wage does create unemployment. it also creates unemployment for both small companies who can't afford to carry on the cost to their customers. ho
approach these issues and it really requires a multidisciplinary approach. what works in an environment in new york city isn't going to work in rural america, and there are 6,000 or 7,000 school districts in this country. one size doesn't fit all solutions are pretty clear. there are many things we can do, we can do now. let's not let those things that divide us, prevent us from moving forward in the things we're on agreement on now. >> let's keep talking, though, about what the nra does want to do right now, which is put armed police officers in schools. you know, there was an armed deputy assigned to columbine in and around the time of that massacre. his name was neil gardner, and he was monitoring students just offcampus when the students started shooting. he was one of the first to respond. i want to read to you what he said after the newtown massacre. he said if you live through a school shooting, you understand you don't really need these weapons. i don't know why a normal person would need an assault rifle. virginia tech had it's own police force. others did too. we are talking a
the impact of -- >> on the environment -- >> the death of a princess. >> live from the johnson space center. >> you feel as though they love you? >> never forget the primary mission, we're newscast. >> history -- >> i was really mad that i was nine months pregnant. i was not at the berlin wall. i was like, hello, it's coming down, and i am here and can't travel. this is not acceptable. >> the terrible destruction left in the wake of hurricane andrew -- >> tragic ending to a fairytale that never quite was right. >> if i'm feeling this sense of loss, then the viewers are certainly going to be feeling the sense of loss. we owe it to them to tell the story as best we can. >> people around the country have begun to mourn the kennedy family's apparent latest tragedy today. >> we'll have a look at all the irony and joy as well as the tragedy in the life of john kennedy jr. >> we have breaking news to report for you this morning. it appears that 6-year-old elian gonzalez has been removed -- >> oklahoma city, so much heartache and still hope. >> the people versus o.j. simpson. >> an elected presiden
, called the raging bull thesis. the argument we were moving from a trading environment, which they had been talking about for ten years, and moving towards a new secular bull market beginning in 2013. that means you take out the old highs. we still believe that, 1615 who take out the old highs. housing getting better, turning after six years after a horrible recession. we're looking at the energy boom in the country. we're looking at the wireless mobility aspects to technology and we're looking at the -- one other phenomenon is the competitiveness. >> does that bring mom and pop home? >> what will bring mom and pop home ultimately is losing a little bit of money in their bond funds. over $1 trillion in bond funds over the last four years. but if you look at survey work, particularly survey of consumer finance by the federal reserve board, you'll see that people still want to buy equities. that's been true for the survey for the last, you know, 10, 12 years, despite what just happened. most people don't understand this, 35 to 39-year-olds is a cohort of the americans who begin to save f
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)